About The Project

What? 

Our mission is to build a permanent rural school in one of the world’s poorest countries, Guinea-Bissau. A school and adjoining well will help break the cycle of poverty and will give an elementary school education to children who have no access to any type of schooling. The well will allow children to perform their chore of fetching water for their families without having to walk long distances.

 

Where?

The exact location of the school will be announced in September 2011 after carefully evaluating various sites in the Gabu area of Guinea Bissau. The area near Gabu, in Eastern Guinea-Bissau is the poorest region of this country. Most of the population lives in small villages.

When?

Fund raising began in the Summer of 2011. We aim to complete our fundraising efforts by December 2011 and peform the ground breaking ceremony for the school on January 28th, 2012. Construction will begin shortly thereafter and we’d like the school to open its doors in September 2012.

Why?

The mostly Fulani population lives in agricultural villages and lives off of subsistence farming and cattle herding. Most of the children work the fields or watch the animals from an early age. Access to schools is very limited. Most children never have the chance to go to school. The government is too weak and poor to provide schooling for these kids. Most Fulani children here never set foot in a school. Education is provided by missionary groups on an ad-hoc basis. A permanent school can improve lives of individuals and their communities.

 

Who?

Fundraising and project coordination is done by the Organizing Committee Of The Budapest-Bamako Rally. Participants of this charity rally have built schools in Mali and dug wells in Mauritania and Mali in previous years. Construction is expected to be carried out under the supervision of the NGO, Tese which is the Portuguese affiliate of Engineers Without Borders. The operation and day to day management of the school once construction is complete will be performed by Brazilian and Hungarian missionaries performing volunteer work in the area.

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